Critical Toys

Jul 23

Jul 22

Their Miss Possible line of dolls combines the appeal of American Girl with the skill development of GoldieBlox.

These young women have left Barbie so far behind.

The first doll will be the childhood version of Marie Curie, the Nobel Prize-winning chemist and physicist whose research led to breakthroughs on radioactivity. The second in the production line would be Bessie Coleman, the first African-American female aviator and first American to hold an international pilot’s license. The third woman they’ve chosen in their doll line-up is Ada Lovelace, known as the world’s first computer programmer.

Each doll will come with a smartphone app with a set of experiments and activities the child can do in the spirit of the doll’s namesake. The Marie Curie app will have instructions on making a compass, creating a chemical reaction with Elmer’s glue and experimenting with magnetism. It’s like a digital science kit with materials typically found in the house. The app also delves into the biography of the woman.

Toys can be powerful tools, letting children imagine a narrative of what’s possible in their own lives. But they have become increasingly gendered, pink, superficial and sexualized, since we were children. (via Marie Curie prepares to throw down with Barbie : Parenting)
Their Miss Possible line of dolls combines the appeal of American Girl with the skill development of GoldieBlox. These young women have left Barbie so far behind. The first doll will be the childhood version of Marie Curie, the Nobel Prize-winning chemist and physicist whose research led to breakthroughs on radioactivity. The second in the production line would be Bessie Coleman, the first African-American female aviator and first American to hold an international pilot’s license. The third woman they’ve chosen in their doll line-up is Ada Lovelace, known as the world’s first computer programmer. Each doll will come with a smartphone app with a set of experiments and activities the child can do in the spirit of the doll’s namesake. The Marie Curie app will have instructions on making a compass, creating a chemical reaction with Elmer’s glue and experimenting with magnetism. It’s like a digital science kit with materials typically found in the house. The app also delves into the biography of the woman. Toys can be powerful tools, letting children imagine a narrative of what’s possible in their own lives. But they have become increasingly gendered, pink, superficial and sexualized, since we were children.
(via Marie Curie prepares to throw down with Barbie : Parenting)

Jul 21
legosaurus:

Brick by Brick: Inside Lego
(2014) Not Rated - 20m
Travel to Lego’s Denmark headquarters to learn about the toy manufacturer’s history and production, as well as the CEO who helped revive the brand.
Add/Watch on Netflix
(via:netflixia)

legosaurus:

Brick by Brick: Inside Lego

(2014) Not Rated - 20m

Travel to Lego’s Denmark headquarters to learn about the toy manufacturer’s history and production, as well as the CEO who helped revive the brand.

Add/Watch on Netflix

(via:netflixia)


Jul 19
fastcompany:

The Spark sounds like a maraca but is actually an energy-generating gadget.

Sudha Kheterpal has been a professional percussionist for 20 years, so she knows how much energy goes into making a beat. Now, she wants to harness that energy to generate power.
Read More>

fastcompany:

The Spark sounds like a maraca but is actually an energy-generating gadget.

image

Sudha Kheterpal has been a professional percussionist for 20 years, so she knows how much energy goes into making a beat. Now, she wants to harness that energy to generate power.

Read More>


minusbaby:

“How-to Guide: Makeshift Tear-Gas Mask" [2014] Illustrated by Marwan Kaabour at Barnbrook

minusbaby:

How-to Guide: Makeshift Tear-Gas Mask" [2014] Illustrated by Marwan Kaabour at Barnbrook


Jul 17

Jul 14

asylum-art:

Bart Hess :Heart to Mouth High

Bart Hess has dreamed up a marvelously weird and rubbery take on love.

Watch the video:

Heart to Mouth High from bart hess on Vimeo.

(via asylum-art)



lukewadethompson:

From Sophie de Oliveira Brata’s Alternative Limb Project

Adding to the Critical Toys collection. Herein toys are a subject of enquiry and are thought of as sculptural or figurative works in tangible materials that are maipulated by humans. The objects collected simultaneously present a critical and playful face to the world.

(via kadrey)


Jul 7

zerostatereflex:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

(via absurdhowl)


txchnologist:

Sewing Machine Makes Cheap Stretchy Component Needed For Wearable Tech And Soft Robots

Purdue University engineers have come up with a new and simpler way to make stretchy connections for electronics. Such power- and information-transporting materials are needed for soft robotics, next-generation implants and wearable technologies to advance.

The group used a regular sewing machine to sew a wire in a zigzag pattern on a sheet of the plastic PET with water-soluble thread. A stretchy, rubbery polymer was poured over the wire and water was then used to dissolve the thread. The PET was pulled away after the thread dissolved and released it from the wire, which was now embedded in the rubbery polymer. 

Read More

(via absurdhowl)


christianmccrea:

me irl

christianmccrea:

me irl


inspirewiki:

Within the next 10 years, we will be 3D printing our own clothes.

Meet OpenKnit, the first open-source clothing printer.

As noted futurist and self-proclaimed technology oracle Ray Kurzweil said at Google’s I/O conference yesterday, the 3D printing hype, while partly a result of the boom-bust-recovery theory of capitalism, should be taken seriously—at least for the sake of fashion.

In less than ten years, you’re probably going to be able to print your own open source clothes for a few cents, he told the audience, presenting more upward trending graphs than a keynote at a hot air balloon convention.

And he’s probably going to be right, as he has been with many of his other educated guesses ​about what the future will hold for us, technologically speaking (three quarters precisely correct predictions, he said​).

Read more….

OMG Yes!

(via absurdhowl)


theeconomist:

In April 2012 we produced a cover on 3D printing entitled “The third industrial revolution” it inspired Kae Woei Lim, a designer at XYZ Workshop, to actually recreate it in three dimensions. The results are superb. 


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