Critical Toys

Oct 18
thekidshouldseethis:

Samantha Bryan shares how she makes her fairies, from their beetle-bums, to their practical flight suits, to the equipment they need to identify, collect, and spread fairy dust across the land.
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

Samantha Bryan shares how she makes her fairies, from their beetle-bums, to their practical flight suits, to the equipment they need to identify, collect, and spread fairy dust across the land.

Watch the video.

(via thisway)


Oct 16

futurescope:

Robot paralysed by choice of who to save

New Scientist has a story about a new experiment that tests Asimov’s fictional First Law of Robotics in which ethical robots prevent humans from coming to harm.

CAN we teach a robot to be good? Fascinated by the idea, roboticist Alan Winfield of Bristol Robotics Laboratory in the UK built an ethical trap for a robot – and was stunned by the machine’s response.

In an experiment, Winfield and his colleagues programmed a robot to prevent other automatons – acting as proxies for humans – from falling into a hole. This is a simplified version of Isaac Asimov’s fictional First Law of Robotics – a robot must not allow a human being to come to harm.

[read more]

(via emergentfutures)


Oct 9

Oct 7
minipaperpavilion:

The Action-Activity Quadrant Pavilion

minipaperpavilion:

The Action-Activity Quadrant Pavilion


Oct 5

Filamaker: turn misbegotten 3D prints back into filament [2013]

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

Joris sez, “I interviewed Marek Senický about his Filamaker today. The device is a grinder and filament extruder that recycles waste plastic and turns old unwanted 3D prints into new ones. I think its amazing and will greatly reduce the cost of 3D printing. Effectively to zero if waste is used [Ed: that’s artistic license — I’m sure Joris is familiar with the second law of thermodynamics]. It will also make 3D printing much greener.”

Read the rest…


notational:

westbor0baptistchurch:

sixpenceee:

123D Catch is an I-Phone and Android App that allows you to create 3D models by taking a bunch of pictures from various directions. These models can later be 3D printed. (Website)

C L O N E   M Y  S O N 

123D Catch is great fun.



purestform:

Folded Frosted Polypropvia Polly Verity

purestform:

Folded Frosted Polyprop
via Polly Verity


Oct 2
robotsinsider:

DARPA’s Soft Robot can Change Color According to Surface http://ift.tt/1u8qe1K

robotsinsider:

DARPA’s Soft Robot can Change Color According to Surface http://ift.tt/1u8qe1K


Sep 30

futurescope:

Zoobotics is developing modular animal-like robots made from paper, wood or plastics that can be assembled with a few tools

A startup from Hamburg (Germany) is experimenting with tetra- and hexapods, made from cardboard and paper. All technical functions are controlled by an Arduino Uno. Estimated base price incl all parts and reusable components atm around 300 €. They’re aiming for a crowdfunding release at the end of 2014. Count me in.

Description of Zuri 01:

ZURI is a programmable robot made from paper and grey cardboard. This motion machine, conceived of as a kit, can be assembled with a few tools (cutter, ruler, cutting mat, bone folder, glue and screwdriver). In addition to a distance sensor, the Paper Robot has servo motors, servo controllers and a Bluetooth module for wireless control via PC or smartphone.

ZURI is a modular robotic system. It is based on two leg variants (2DOF / 3DOF) and two different body modules (1M / 2M). The combination of leg and body modules allows for a lot of robot variations. This results in different degrees of difficulty regarding programming and coordination of the running gaits.

The ZURI-PAPERBOT-SYSTEM combines disciplines such as modeling, the use of electronics and programming. It is perfect for use in the classroom.

[Zoobotics] [long feature in german on golem] [all pictures by zoobotics]


Sep 28
The Soft Robotics Toolkit is a collection of shared resources to support the design, fabrication, modeling, characterization, and control of soft robotic devices. The toolkit was developed as part of educational research being undertaken in the Harvard Biodesign Lab. The ultimate aim of the toolkit is to advance the field of soft robotics by allowing designers and researchers to build upon each other’s work. The toolkit includes an open source fluidic control board, detailed design documentation describing a wide range of soft robotic components (including actuators and sensors), and related files that can be downloaded and used in the design, manufacture, and operation of soft robots. In combination with low material costs and increasingly accessible rapid prototyping technologies such as 3D printers, laser cutters, and CNC mills, the toolkit enables soft robotic components to be produced easily and affordably. Each section of the site focuses on a soft robotic device or component, and includes the following sections: Design: A description of the device and how it works, with related design files that can be downloaded and guidelines on potential modifications you could make to the design.
Fabrication: A bill of materials listing all of the parts, materials, and equipment you will need to build your own device, plus a detailed set of instructions for you to follow.
Modeling: A discussion of modeling and analysis approaches you can use to predict and understand the behavior of the device and optimize your design.
Testing: In order to validate your models and better understand your device, you will need to carry out empirical tests. This section describes the tests that other designers and researchers have carried out and that may provide inspiration for the design of your own experiments.
Case Studies: Examples of how others have used the device or component for real-world applications.
Downloads: All of the files related to the design, fabrication, modeling, testing, and control of the device. (via Soft Robotics Toolkit)

The Soft Robotics Toolkit is a collection of shared resources to support the design, fabrication, modeling, characterization, and control of soft robotic devices. The toolkit was developed as part of educational research being undertaken in the Harvard Biodesign Lab. The ultimate aim of the toolkit is to advance the field of soft robotics by allowing designers and researchers to build upon each other’s work. The toolkit includes an open source fluidic control board, detailed design documentation describing a wide range of soft robotic components (including actuators and sensors), and related files that can be downloaded and used in the design, manufacture, and operation of soft robots. In combination with low material costs and increasingly accessible rapid prototyping technologies such as 3D printers, laser cutters, and CNC mills, the toolkit enables soft robotic components to be produced easily and affordably. Each section of the site focuses on a soft robotic device or component, and includes the following sections: Design: A description of the device and how it works, with related design files that can be downloaded and guidelines on potential modifications you could make to the design.
Fabrication: A bill of materials listing all of the parts, materials, and equipment you will need to build your own device, plus a detailed set of instructions for you to follow.
Modeling: A discussion of modeling and analysis approaches you can use to predict and understand the behavior of the device and optimize your design.
Testing: In order to validate your models and better understand your device, you will need to carry out empirical tests. This section describes the tests that other designers and researchers have carried out and that may provide inspiration for the design of your own experiments.
Case Studies: Examples of how others have used the device or component for real-world applications.
Downloads: All of the files related to the design, fabrication, modeling, testing, and control of the device. (via Soft Robotics Toolkit)


futurescope:

Harvard Biodesign Lab: Soft Robotics Toolkit

Several Harvard University labs in collaboration with Trinity College Dublin have developed a collection of shared resources to support the design, fabrication, modeling, characterization, and control of soft robotic devices, called the Soft Robotics Toolit.

The toolkit was developed as part of educational research being undertaken in the Harvard Biodesign Lab. The ultimate aim of the toolkit is to advance the field of soft robotics by allowing designers and researchers to build upon each other’s work. The toolkit includes an open source fluidic control board, detailed design documentation describing a wide range of soft robotic components (including actuators and sensors), and related files that can be downloaded and used in the design, manufacture, and operation of soft robots. In combination with low material costs and increasingly accessible rapid prototyping technologies such as 3D printers, laser cutters, and CNC mills, the toolkit enables soft robotic components to be produced easily and affordably.

Each section of the site focuses on a soft robotic device or component, and includes the following sections:

  • Design: A description of the device and how it works, with related design files that can be downloaded and guidelines on potential modifications you could make to the design.
  • Fabrication: A bill of materials listing all of the parts, materials, and equipment you will need to build your own device, plus a detailed set of instructions for you to follow.
  • Modeling: A discussion of modeling and analysis approaches you can use to predict and understand the behavior of the device and optimize your design.
  • Testing: In order to validate your models and better understand your device, you will need to carry out empirical tests. This section describes the tests that other designers and researchers have carried out and that may provide inspiration for the design of your own experiments.
  • Case Studies: Examples of how others have used the device or component for real-world applications.
  • Downloads: All of the files related to the design, fabrication, modeling, testing, and control of the device.

The content on this site is drawn from projects carried out in a number of research labs. Our aim is to improve and expand the toolkit by welcoming feedback and contributions from the soft robotics community. If you have an interest in advancing the field and engaging with this community, please get in touch!

[Soft Robotics Toolkit] [paper]

(via emergentfutures)


“He worked with a design team that prototyped an educational television set that could be utilized in the developing countries of Africa and produced in Japan for $9.00 per set (cost in 1970 dollars). His designed products also included a remarkable transistor radio, made from ordinary metal food cans and powered by a burning candle, that was designed to actually be produced cheaply in developing countries.” Victor Papanek - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (via iamdanw)

Sep 26

designboom:

stained glass driverless sleeper car of the future by dominic wilcox
all photos by sylvain deleu

sleep on the go in this autonomous vehicle designed for 2059.

(via thaumatropia)


Sep 25

futurescope:

Harvard researchers have created an unthethered jumping soft robot

A soft robot that uses an “explosive actuator” to propel itself? Yes, please. IEEE features a weird flesh-tone silicone robot, created by Harvard researchers, that could come straight out of a Cronenberg/Gilliam/Carpenter Mashup. Fortunately, the jumps are still very imprecise. Nevertheless, robotic facehuggers!!!11!

The robot’s three legs can be inflated pneumatically, which allows it to orient itself to control the direction of launch. Once it’s pointing the right way, butane (from an internal canister) and oxygen (generated from a mixture of manganese and hydrogen peroxide) are injected into the springy looking appendage at the bottom. A spark is produced, which ignites the mixture, causing an explosion that launches the robot 0.6 meter (7.5 times its body height) into the air. It’s important to note that everything required for the robot to orient and jump is on-board: this is completely untethered and independent of any external infrastructure.

[read more]

(via emergentfutures)


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