Critical Toys

Sep 25
cinoh:

carpentrix:
A lot of people, mostly men, when I say I work as a carpenter, ask me about a toolbelt. I never owned one. I’ve envied and admired M’s, which is worn in like a good pair of boots, but it never felt right to buy myself one, all fresh and stiff. After all, I can shove nails in my front pockets, a pencil in the back, clip a tape to my right hip. And maybe more so it was a doubting if I’d earned one yet.
For this deck project we just finished, we worked with M’s old boss. We arrived at work one early morning and he said, “Got a present for you,” and he pulled out this belt that used to be his and I didn’t think it could really be for me, that maybe it was on loan for the day. I put it on, around my hips, and loved the way it felt, soft and strong, well worn, experienced, an experienced belt. “It’s yours to keep if you want it,” he said. It’s an object that feels instilled with something, some power, used and useful, and I couldn’t believe how cool it felt to wear. I said thank you, thank you, which didn’t do justice to how grateful, flattered, and surprised I was by this good gift.

cinoh:

carpentrix:

A lot of people, mostly men, when I say I work as a carpenter, ask me about a toolbelt. I never owned one. I’ve envied and admired M’s, which is worn in like a good pair of boots, but it never felt right to buy myself one, all fresh and stiff. After all, I can shove nails in my front pockets, a pencil in the back, clip a tape to my right hip. And maybe more so it was a doubting if I’d earned one yet.

For this deck project we just finished, we worked with M’s old boss. We arrived at work one early morning and he said, “Got a present for you,” and he pulled out this belt that used to be his and I didn’t think it could really be for me, that maybe it was on loan for the day. I put it on, around my hips, and loved the way it felt, soft and strong, well worn, experienced, an experienced belt. “It’s yours to keep if you want it,” he said. It’s an object that feels instilled with something, some power, used and useful, and I couldn’t believe how cool it felt to wear. I said thank you, thank you, which didn’t do justice to how grateful, flattered, and surprised I was by this good gift.


Sep 23
Travelling through time these days is easy thanks to TimeTraveller™.
Observe famous historical events and interact with the people who made them happen! Ideal for students, architects, artists, and anyone else who wants to experience history as it really was! (via TimeTraveller™)

Travelling through time these days is easy thanks to TimeTraveller™.
Observe famous historical events and interact with the people who made them happen! Ideal for students, architects, artists, and anyone else who wants to experience history as it really was! (via TimeTraveller™)


bearhatalice:

Today, I was walking to Trader Joe’s when I came across an art fair. It seemed pretty run-of-the-mill: mostly paintings and jewelry, a few clothing booths, and so forth. On my way out, the last booth I passed was selling furniture and household goods made from reclaimed wood. What caught my eye were large wooden chests, almost like foot lockers.


image

Instantly I was taken back to my childhood, I had one of these that my parents always called my “toy chest”. It was nowhere near as beautiful as this one, but it sat at the end of my bed as a bedrock of growing up. Over the years the toys inside changed, but it was always there, and probably still remains in my Mom’s house. We are not speaking right now, and I am not sure my toy chest would survive a cross-country move. It got pretty beat up over the years, the casters each came off one at a time. The corner had the finish scraped off entirely by my alto saxophone, as I sat on it practicing. When I was four we moved into a different house, and I only remember a few things from before that move but one of them was pride in telling one of my parents’ friends that my toy chest was coming with us.

All of this came back to me in an instant as I walked through the booth. I ran through the potential scenarios where I could use this chest. Did I have a need to store something? Not really. Where in my apartment would it go? No clue. Do I need it? Of course not.

I asked how much they cost and the answer was about what I expected. High, but rightfully so, and not the kind of amount you spend on a whim on a Sunday afternoon. I thanked them and walked over to Trader Joe’s.

The entire time I was in the store, I could not get the chest out of my mind. When I finished checking out, I walked back over to the art fair. There were more people at the booth now, and both of the men working there were showing off cutting boards and dressers.

I walked back up to the chest and lifted up the lid. It was heavy. The scent of fresh pine was immediate. Actual fresh pine, not the chemical smell you get with cleaning supplies. I asked one of the men working the booth if they had a card, and he fumbled around until he handed me a small slip of paper with the artist’s name, phone number and AOL email address. He said they were from San Diego.

Walking back to my car, I thought about how if I had children (I am probably not going to), I would want them to have this chest, or one like it. For it to be there for them the way my toy chest was there for me. I thought about the childhood I would want to give my imaginary children, about the family I would have. I thought about the life choices I have made that put me in this place, walking alone in Los Angeles on a Sunday afternoon.

But mostly I thought about the chest. I am still thinking about it.

(via wilwheaton)



Sep 21

prostheticknowledge:

WirePrint

Prototyping 3D printing method from HPI reduces construction time of model making by a tenth creating wireframe versions of forms - video embedded below:

WirePrint prints 3D objects as wireframe previews. By extruding filament directly into 3D space instead of printing layer-wise, it achieves a speed-up of up to a factor of 10, allowing designers to iterate more quickly in the early stages of design …

Even though considered a rapid prototyping tool, 3D printing is so slow that a reasonably sized object requires printing overnight. This slows designers down to a single iteration per day. With WirePrint, we propose to instead print low-fidelity wireframe previews in the early stages of the design process. Wireframe previews are 3D prints in which surfaces have been replaced with a wireframe mesh. Since wireframe previews are to scale and represent the overall shape of the 3D object, they allow users to quickly verify key aspects of their 3D design, such as the ergonomic fit.

More Here

(via notational)


Sep 20

prostheticknowledge:

3D Printed ArcheAge

Curious little project by caretdashcaret reconstructs a game avatar with photogrammetry app Catch 123D and 3D prints the results:

Here’s my 3D print of a Firran from the video game ArcheAge

Instead of using the in-game models for 3D printing, I took a lot of screenshots and reconstructed a model using photogrammetry.

Whilst to some it maybe pointless, it is an interesting experiment in modern mediation - applying a computed reconstruction method on an already virtual object, observing the differences between the two …

You can find out more about the process here
An interactive model of the scene can be found here
caretdashcaret also has a Tumblr blog here
[h/t: Jeffrey Huber]



Sep 18

Sep 8

girls-on-girls-on-bikes:

fixdetroit:

lacletaoficial:

steffgutovska:

I got to meet the most amazing people in Zurich. These guys ride despite of 1000 Euro fine for riding brakeless. Huge respect. 

Esto es estilo de vida.

Damn thats legit. I like that disassembled bike on the wall too. 

1000 euros? that’s insane


Sep 2

design-is-fine:

Dieter Rams & Jürgen Greubel, Lectron System, 1967-69. Elements, Experiment card, book laboratory, Minisystem and hobby set radio receiver. Germany. Via dasprogramm.org

(via thaumatropia)


Sep 1
whitneymuseum:

Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! 

whitneymuseum:

Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! 

(via variumfemina)


Aug 30

(via kenyatta)


Aug 26

Ultimately, the team hope soft robots will be able to manipulate the bricks themselves, leading to self-replication bots that could swap parts in and out as needed. Journal reference: Advanced Materials http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.201401642/abstract (via Squidgy ‘click-e-bricks’ will let robots fix themselves - tech - 07 August 2014 - New Scientist)


Aug 23

Aug 20
emergentfutures:

Wearable tech can be implanted in brains, thanks to new power technique



A research breakthrough has identified a way to charge tiny health-tracking devices that could be embedded in our brains, hearts or livers


Full Story: The Guardian

emergentfutures:

Wearable tech can be implanted in brains, thanks to new power technique

A research breakthrough has identified a way to charge tiny health-tracking devices that could be embedded in our brains, hearts or livers

Full Story: The Guardian